Reflections and Failure

The easiest thing to do after failure is to look for the culprit. Too often you find it staring back in the mirror. I believe failure is important for self-growth and life without failure is boring.

One of my favorite things to do is reflecting. How did I get here? What did I learn there? What could I have done better? What did I gain? By asking these questions it is easier for me to process the failure in a constructive way. And I don’t mean this has to happen over-night, some things require years to become so distant that it is possible to look at them objectively.

Failure is necessary

Having always liked the idiom ‘failure is the mother of success’, I know that without taking all these crazy steps I wouldn’t be where I am now.
For example, I moved to Scotland to study International Relations and Politics, without really thinking about it twice. The subject turned out to be something totally uninteresting to me, but the experience as a whole was something that defined me as a person. I quit at the University after the first year, skipping my last tests being severely depressed and full of anxiety. But after this I had to take a step back, go back to work and really think of what I want to do. I later discovered that my true passion is in sales, but that is a topic for another day.

C’est la vie.

One thing is sure, not all things are important enough to dwell on. Bashing yourself afterward a failure for weeks is useless, because what is done is done. I have failed many things. One reason that this happens is that I am quite impulsive and head-strong – if I really want to do something, I usually will. That is just the way I am, I like to dive head first and face the music. Because I am not anymore scared of failing, I can use it as fuel. Fuel to take me far from here.

Failure = Growth

Author: Ida Männistö

An tech enthusiast working at a global energy automation company. Blogs about work and tea.

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